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FAQs

1. Why is Old Print Reproductions reproducing historic documents?

OPR is on a mission to save as many historic documents as possible by creating a digital image. We have been reproducing art for artists and scanning historic documents using our Cruse Scanner for years. OPR knows that many of our nation’s and the world’s contemporary documents are now reaching 150 years old and could be lost or destroyed in the not too distant future.

Since we have the technology that the Smithsonian and The National Archives has for capturing history we decided that we would like to contribute our time and resources to do the same thing. We hope people will come forward and allow us to scan their images and put them on this site for resale and the enjoyment for all.

2. What qualifies a document to be Cruse scanned at no charge by Old Print Reproductions?

OPR requires that all historic documents not be under copyright restrictions. We are not selective about the subject or a geographical area. The document must have at least community value and be owned by an individual not a business. No charge scans must also be accompanied by a print order.

Art and documents very narrowly focused on a family’s history can be reproduced through our art reproduction business. Please contact us through our website at Fine Art Giclées.

3. What if I don’t want my historic document placed on the Old Print Reproductions website for resale?

We are happy to scan your documents and art at our standard rates providing there are no copyright issues. OPR charges $85 per scan and $35 for color management. We provide a CD with a high res printable image and also a web sized jpeg. We also provide an 8×10 proof. All giclées printed by us are accompanied with certificates of authenticity.   If your images are small please ask us for our special rates for smaller images.

 

4. How does Old Print Reproductions price the historic document reproductions?

OPR is not charging for the historic document… how do you value one.. they are priceless? We only charge for the printing of the document.   We hope that our followers will see that we are truly trying to preserve as many historic documents as possible and that others like us will take us up on our offer to let us reproduce their historic documents at no charge and in exchange will allow us to put them on this site for the world to see and for resale.

 

5. What is the Cruse Scanner?

The most technologically advanced, large format, high resolution scanner in the world. World-renowned organizations like The Smithsonian, The National Archives, The Pentagon, and the Vatican Secret Archives use the Cruse Scanner to capture and preserve priceless artifacts and images.   With the Cruse Scanner FA185, OPR brings the digital revolution now occurring in the art world to reproducing historical documents and opens up a world of opportunity that includes museum curators, archivists, antique dealers, interior designers, and most importantly historians who want to preserve our history for the next generation and… anyone who has anything fragile, over-sized, old or original that should be scanned and saved.

6. What kind of printer does Old Print Reproductions Use?

OPR only uses the Epson 9800 with Epson Ink. We do not take short cuts to save money.

 

7. How are reproductions sized?

All of the historic documents have different sizes. To make it easy, we offer the reproductions based on the long side of the document. The short side will be proportional to the original short side based on the new length of the long side.

 

8. What is a giclée?

The word giclée is derived from the French word gicler which means to spray or spout. The technology of the giclee printer sprays thousands of micro-sized dots of archival ink on archival papers and canvases. This technology provides the best high resolution image possible for fine art and historic document reproductions.

 

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